Saturday, 21 September 2013

The Pants Block Part 3. More about The Crotch and Fixing the Seat of my Pants


Dear Sewing Friends,

Most of you know I have been drafting a pants block following instructions in the book Pattern Cutting by Dennic Chunman Lo. In my previous two posts I  covered my journey in drafting a block and getting as far as a first muslin. I got to the the point where I had to deal with my own body's individual shape and that is where the book and I parted company.

The crotch is the crux of the matter. Pun intended. If the crotch curve, depth and angle are not right nothing will be right and it's that not quite right fit or baggy pantsville forever. No way! Crotch curve or die!

I had done one of two methods I had read about, the aluminum foil templates. This had limited results. I then went and bought myself the equipment for another method I had read about, using a flexible rule.


I bought this at Lincraft and had another go. The idea is you put an elastic band on it, mold the entire curve to your crotch from front to back then move the elatsic band to mark your mid line and somehow get that thing off while maintaining the complete curve.  Now unless you are Olga Korbut I suspect you need a sewing buddy to help get the bendy rule off you. I at least, could not seem to do it properly by myself. While it did give me a good idea of the crotch shape I wanted to be exact and I racked my brains for what I could do and the light bulb went on.

I would measure a favourtie pair of almost worn out jeans and transfer the markings. I don't know if you've ever really looked at a worn out garment before throwing it out but it will take on the shape of your body. If you have been lucky enough to find a perfectly fitting pair of RTW pants keep them when they are worn out to copy.







Front




Previously, when I had done a front crotch template with the foil I suspected that I had to move the CF over a little but now I was sure.

I redrew my pants block. What I had taken away from the CF and CB I had to add to the sides and in terms of the back, maintain the angle of the tilt of the torso.



In the meantime I had also started to work on the legs trying to take in the back leg. Here I have taken out a narrow diagonal crease from low side hip to knee level.

You cannot have a back leg side seam that differs too drastically to side front leg side seam because they have to go together in a way that will not pull and the finished lengths of these seam lines have to be the same. (From Threads magazine articles that I will reference at the end of the series).

Also because of the slight curving at the waist and hip, the side seam will end up 1cm to 1.5 cm longer than the original frame measurement of waist to floor. (From Pattern Cutting).



Ok, now I had enough room around my waist and hips but still had a baggy under ass/thigh area. I fiddled, I put on high heels. It wasn't a lower leg propping things up issue. I tried narrowing the back leg by a 4mm at each side. This helped but my Ah Ha! moment came when I did this..

  

That's where I needed to take some out! It even made the front sit better.



Happy times! This has been  a long post. I will transfer the cross thigh reduction fold to my pants block and cut out a wearable muslin. 

The cotton is flapping in the breeze, drying.

Have a good day,

Val. 

20 comments:

  1. When I was in the USA a few years ago I and my sewing buddies purchased that flexible ruler but it was twice the length, making it a bit easier to work with. I had never thought about taking the crotch curve from a worn out pair of pants, thank you for this tip and everything else you have shared. Now that last adjustment is that the flat butt that they all talk about?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sharon. I think the flat butt adjustment is higher across the actual crotch curve. Mine was across the thigh 5cm under the crotch curve. I will post pictures in my next post.

      Delete
    2. Sharon, you were correct. When I went back and checked exactly where I had pinned it the adjustment was across the lower part of the crotch curve....but I had to do an adjustment lower down at thigh level as well. Post coming!

      Delete
  2. Thank you so much for showing us how to get that perfect pants block. I have been battling with the same issues on my attempts. You have given me encouragement to return to my muslins (yes, there are many) and figure out just what exactly is the solution. Good luck with your wearable muslin. By the way, exactly what is a good fit for a pair of trousers that are not super tight jeans or leggings? I would love to know what to aim for. Just because I am no longer young it doesn't mean I have to wear frumpy baggy pants!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ozviking. The book recommends total circumferential tolerance (ease) of Waist 1.5cm, HIp 7cm, Total crotch length 3cm (so you can sit down), top of Thighs 4cm, Knee 13 cm, Calf 9 cm, and Ankle 14cm so you can get your foot and heel through. This is for wovens. The block is for a slim fitting slacks shape.

      Delete
  3. I thought about a horizontal fold when I looked at the back view, make sure you can move around and bend down in them though:-) they are looking good and enjoying the progress.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And sit! Don't worry, I will test all that out when I wear the wearable muslin that I have almost finished.

      Delete
  4. I am super impressed with your dedication to this task Val, as I know I would have given up at the first hurdle. The calico is looking really good - Well Done!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Patricia. I had a fair idea of the work it would take. I had attempted it before years ago but I know a bit more now...

      Delete
  5. Super! Btw love the picture in the wall behind you, could you move over please so i can see more? LOL,

    ReplyDelete
  6. OK I will take one of the picture instead of just having sunflowers growing out of my head. It is a print of a painting by an Australian artist called Sarina overlooking Sydney Harbour.

    ReplyDelete
  7. That flexible curve tool looks interesting, but does it do more than holding a tape measure on its edge?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ok, I'm catching up on my blog reading so I'm excited to go back and read your other pants block posts. You always give such good info. I always have wrinkles on the backs of my legs in my rtw to wear pants. I've always wondered if that is normal somewhat or if there is a fix if I ever decide to venture back in to pants-making. Love your pattern weights!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Congratulations! You´ve been working so hard and achieve so much already. I didn´t know about that tool, and it looks very useful!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you ladies.

    Gail The flexible rule holds it's shape about the same as the folded foil did but it stays in place on the paper better for the first trace off (both will need a bit of trueing). But it will be very useful as a tracing tool for Burdastyles...

    liza jane..I think we have similar body issues, glad to help,,and glad you like my elephants..

    Merche.. The hard work was in trying to write down the process clearly. I am glad it is appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Great work Valerie. Your pants block is coming along nicely. Won't it be great to have it to make perfect pants from!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Really enjoying this series of posts. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Valerie, it is a big job getting a pants block correct. I am not sure I would have the patience. I can't wait to see the end results. I am sure it will be worth it :-)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Fantastic solution! I am eager to see your final results. Maybe it will give me the courage to attempt to sew pants!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm enjoying reading about your pants block journey. Love that bendy rule!

    ReplyDelete